frankly, my dear...

Side by Side (#40)

This was great. And as a person who, no matter how intriguing the subject matter, tends to get stir crazy during docs, I really mean it when I say I was fascinated. This is a really necessary movie for anyone interested in filmmaking, even with Keanu Reeves narrating (he’s actually quite good in his producing/interviewing role). The debate over film vs. digital is an interesting one, and I’ll throw my thoughts up later in a┬áseparate┬ápost, but I think that Christopher Kenneally and Reeves do a really good job presenting the passion of both sides of the coin. There’s some great info and interesting interviews with industry professionals and I highly recommend checking it out. (Thanks diddywah!)

(Source: thisjuliet)

Three Days of the Condor (#47)
This was really good with the ending motivation being surprisingly relevant even 37 years later. Question: Does it get any better than Robert Redford in the 70s? Answer: No, so let’s move on. Faye Dunaway is good here as well (no surprise) though I have to agree with the observations of George Clooney and J. Lo in Out of Sight that they fall in love way too easily and without motivation for it to feel real (despite being two of the most beautiful people ever, their love seen makes it very clear that neither one is particularly into it). But that’s really the only prominent flaw of the movie, so it’s forgivable. Otherwise, everything is masterfully controlled by the fabulous Sydney Pollack. The movie is well paced, well written, well performed, and decidedly thrilling. Max von Sydow is also great, especially his mini-monologue at the end (probably the best part of the movie, even if I didn’t feel it really growing organically). It’s great.

Three Days of the Condor (#47)

This was really good with the ending motivation being surprisingly relevant even 37 years later. Question: Does it get any better than Robert Redford in the 70s? Answer: No, so let’s move on. Faye Dunaway is good here as well (no surprise) though I have to agree with the observations of George Clooney and J. Lo in Out of Sight that they fall in love way too easily and without motivation for it to feel real (despite being two of the most beautiful people ever, their love seen makes it very clear that neither one is particularly into it). But that’s really the only prominent flaw of the movie, so it’s forgivable. Otherwise, everything is masterfully controlled by the fabulous Sydney Pollack. The movie is well paced, well written, well performed, and decidedly thrilling. Max von Sydow is also great, especially his mini-monologue at the end (probably the best part of the movie, even if I didn’t feel it really growing organically). It’s great.

Sense and Sensibility (#40)

For the first time all year I think I can finally say that I’ve found a movie I loved. Sense and Sensibility is the one Jane Austen book I’ve never been able to get beyond the first few pages but after watching the movie I think I’ll have to give it another go. Emma Thompson is a) brilliant as Elinor Dashwood (my new favorite Austen heroine next to Elizabeth Bennet) and b) completely deserving of her Best Adapted Screenplay Oscar - the script is simply fantastic. The very young Kate Winslet is also wonderfully passionate, though Hugh Grant stole every scene he was in to me. I don’t know why, but he was fantastic here. I think it’s a generational thing, having been introduced to Alan Rickman as Severus Snape, but it’s hard to believe him in romantic roles no matter how great he is (still very good, despite being so much older than Kate). The cinematography is wonderful, even if the DVD audio was rather strange at moments, and it felt more period authentic and less glossy than most Austen adaptations. All in all, I loved it and may very well track down a copy to purchase.

The African Queen (#35) (#156)

Not that you need me to re-affirm it, but this is a really well done film and I’m so glad that they finally got around to transferring it to DVD (and the transfer is quite good I must say). Humphrey Bogart’s rarely been so good and I’m very glad he won his Oscar for this (I’m pretty sure his hippo imitation was the clincher. Hilarious). Katherine Hepburn’s also notable and didn’t get on my nerves half so much as she normally does. The cinematography, special effects, writing and direction are all wonderful. I completely understand why it’s a classic and so widely admired. Very good love story, very good movie.

"I’m gonna buy a gun and start a war if you can tell me something worth fighting for."

— Coldplay (Rush of Blood to the Head)

Arctic Monkeys = my current music love. They’re amazing. I’d love to see them live.

Arctic Monkeys = my current music love. They’re amazing. I’d love to see them live.

"If you write a story about a soldier going AWOL and kidnapping a pregnant woman and finally shooting her in the head, it’s called searingly realistic, even though it’s never happened in the history of mankind. Whereas if you write about two people falling in love, which happens about a million times a day all over the world, for some reason or another, you’re accused of writing something unrealistic and sentimental."

— Richard Curtis

The Third Man

Ah, film noir. When you are done right, I adore you. And as far as I’m concerned, film noir should always include Orson Welles. This was really good and a classic I’m very glad to have seen. The cinematography and general mise-en-scene are terrific, as are the performances and much of the dialogue. Well worth seeing if you like classic black and white films of intense cinematic merit.

Like the fella says, in Italy for 30 years under the Borgias they had warfare, terror, murder, and bloodshed, but they produced Michelangelo, Leonardo da Vinci, and the Renaissance. In Switzerland they had brotherly love - they had 500 years of democracy and peace, and what did that produce? The cuckoo clock.” - Harry Lime