Heat (#70) (#164)
While rather overlong and dragging in areas, Heat really is a brilliantly executed movie. It’s reminiscent of the great crime films of the 70s while bringing to new heights the fantastically cinematic grittiness of 90s Los Angeles. Even if it could have been condensed, Michael Mann does a terrific job writing and directing, control his material completely. The performances are superb across the board, except for, somewhat strangely, Ashley Judd and Val Kilmer, who pale against the A-list perfection of the rest of the cast. While I’m not a die hard Robert De Niro fan, he’s great here, as is, surprisingly, a young Natalie Portman, who brings about the most hear breaking part of the movie. (Also, I love Tom Sizemore.) The real reason to watch is for Al Pacino, though. The man is SPECTACULAR. (Tumblr: remind me to watch more of him.) This isn’t a heist film, it’s a dark crime film, and it sets out to do what it means to do beautifully.

Heat (#70) (#164)

While rather overlong and dragging in areas, Heat really is a brilliantly executed movie. It’s reminiscent of the great crime films of the 70s while bringing to new heights the fantastically cinematic grittiness of 90s Los Angeles. Even if it could have been condensed, Michael Mann does a terrific job writing and directing, control his material completely. The performances are superb across the board, except for, somewhat strangely, Ashley Judd and Val Kilmer, who pale against the A-list perfection of the rest of the cast. While I’m not a die hard Robert De Niro fan, he’s great here, as is, surprisingly, a young Natalie Portman, who brings about the most hear breaking part of the movie. (Also, I love Tom Sizemore.) The real reason to watch is for Al Pacino, though. The man is SPECTACULAR. (Tumblr: remind me to watch more of him.) This isn’t a heist film, it’s a dark crime film, and it sets out to do what it means to do beautifully.